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Largest Dinosaur Footprint

Largest Dinosaur Footprint Found In Western Australia; Aussie Jurassic Park Wealth Of Information For Researchers

By Carrie Winters - Mar 28, 2017 05:38 AM EDT

The largest dinosaur footprint had been discovered by scientists in Western Australia. The track is known to be from a sauropod or long-necked dinosaur.

Oldest Plant Discovered

Ancient Plants Discovered In Central India; Could Be The Oldest Specimen On Earth

By Carrie Winters - Mar 15, 2017 08:50 AM EDT

Researchers discovered the oldest plant-like fossils in central India. These had the characteristics of red algae according to the study.

Jane Austen

A New Theory On Jane Austen's Death May Be Arsenic Poisoning According To A Research

By Carrie Winters - Mar 13, 2017 06:06 AM EDT

Jane Austen may have died because of arsenic poisoning according to a new research. The author died when she was 41 years old and had been open about her poor eyesight.

True's Beaked Whale

True's Beaked Whale Captured On Video, What We Need To Know About The North Atlantic Rare Whale

By Carrie Winters - Mar 09, 2017 04:01 PM EST

The True's beaked whale has been captured on video in the wild. this is the first time that the rare whale species had been seen.

Tiny Frog Species Discovered

New Tiny Frog Species Discovered; Smallest Known Frogs In The World As Small As A Thumbnail

By Carrie Winters - Feb 23, 2017 05:30 AM EST

Seven species of frogs have recently been discovered in India. The discovery includes four miniature frogs and all the species belong to genus Nyctibatrachus.

Plimoth Plantation Recreates World Of The Pilgrims

Archeologist Unearthed Plymouth History: Thanksgiving History May Change For Good. Fun Facts In Pre-Colonial America

By Michael Davis - Nov 26, 2016 10:19 AM EST

The Pre-colonial America has its finest story as these researchers uncover more relics from the 12th century.

More than half of links shared on Twitter go unread: Study

More than half of links shared on Twitter go unread: Study

By Ajay Kadkol - Jun 23, 2016 11:58 AM EDT

People are quicker to share than read news on Twitter, according to a new study which found that 59 per cent of all links shared on the website went unclicked, and presumably unread, even by people who shared them. The tiny fraction of headlines that news editors push out on Twitter draw a large share of eyeballs, but it is the stories recommended by friends that trigger more clicks, the study found. In what may be the first independent study of news consumption on social media, researchers at Columbia University and the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA) found that reader referrals drove 61 per cent of the nearly 10 million clicks in a random sample of news stories posted on Twitter.

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Tutankhamen’s Dagger Made of Meteorite, Study Says

By Jenn Loro - Jun 08, 2016 03:14 PM EDT

Flat ‘metalenses’ may soon redefine industries that rely on the current optical technology largely based on conventional curved lenses. The latest breakthrough churned out from one of Harvard University’s tech labs can magnify objects with 30% greater and more focused sharpness than most top-end microscopes.

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Flat 'Metalenses' Is the Newest Breakthrough in Optics

By Jenn Loro - Jun 08, 2016 03:11 PM EDT

Flat ‘metalenses’ may soon redefine industries that rely on the current optical technology largely based on conventional curved lenses. The latest breakthrough churned out from one of Harvard University’s tech labs can magnify objects with 30% greater and more focused sharpness than most top-end microscopes.

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Rare 'Baby Dragons' Recorded Hatching in Slovenia Cave

By Jenn Loro - Jun 07, 2016 01:35 PM EDT

Slovenia has witnessed the once-in-a-decade birth of ‘rare baby dragons’ known as olms that is long been considered as the country’s national symbol for centuries. The fragile eel-like sightless creatures can reportedly go on without eating for about a decade.

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Bumblebees' Tiny Electric Field Sensors Helped Them to Sense Flowers

By Jenn Loro - Jun 02, 2016 10:02 AM EDT

Ultrasensitive hairs offer explanation as to how bumblebees pick up weak electrical signals emitted by flowers according to University of Bristol researchers. Previously, scientists think that the ability to sense natural electrical fields was confined only to aquatic creatures.

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Huge Amounts of Corals in Great Barrier Reef Found Dead

By Jenn Loro - Jun 01, 2016 12:13 PM EDT

A third of the coral in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef have reportedly died or are currently dying due to mass bleaching that plagues the Pacific Ocean triggered by global warming and El Nino. Meanwhile, the Australian drew fire for removing sections of the global warming impact on the reef in a UN report for fear of potential harm to the country’s tourism industry.

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Amazing MRI Scans Show Brains with Schizophrenia Trying To Self-Repair!

By Jenn Loro - May 31, 2016 09:03 AM EDT

A new international study brings hope to people suffering from schizophrenia- a mental illness characterized by delusions, chaotic thought patterns, and frequent hallucinations. Researchers reveal that the brains of schizophrenic patients show signs of self-repair based on MRI scans which could lead to possible treatments in the future.

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Antibiotic Superbugs Have Just Reached the US

By Jenn Loro - May 30, 2016 11:02 AM EDT

An antibiotic-resistant superbug has been recently discovered in the US after a Pennsylvania woman exhibited traces of a rare E.Coli strain that resisted antibiotics including Colistin. Reports of E.Coli superbug was previously documented in China but later surfaced in Europe and other parts of the world.

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Mobile Phone Usage Linked To Cancer and Growth of Brain Tumors

By Jenn Loro - May 30, 2016 11:02 AM EDT

Partial findings released by the US National Toxicology Program reveal that mobile phone usage is somehow linked to cancer and growth of brain tumors. However, some experts remain unconvinced as there have been no reports of dramatic surge in cancer cases since mobile handsets came into widespread use in the 90’s.

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