Russian Fisherman Becomes Viral Internet Sensation As He Reveal Photos Of Terrifying Sea Creatures

By R. A. Jayme - 25 Dec '16 12:00PM
  • General Views Of Sochi - 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia: Host City Candidate
  • (Photo : Harry Engels/Getty Image) A general view of fishermen sitting on a pier on November 20, 2011 in Sochi, Russia. Sochi is one of thirteen cities proposed as a host city as Russia prepares to host the 2018 FIFA World Cup. The city will also host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games.

A new internet sensation, Russian fisherman Roman Fedorstov, shared his unique, eerie and bizarre collection of fishes he had caught.

Fedorstov's social media account features unique discovery of different kind of marine animals. He has shared plenty of images on Twitter and Instagram. Fedorstov proudly presents all of these slimy sea creatures in his photos with his bare hands.

It is said that these marine creatures are caught by Fedorstov and his crew in their nets while trawling the deep waters off Russia's Barents Sea. Fedorstov lives in the northwestern Russian city of Murmansk, has gained a massive of followers, Fox News reported.

In one photo he handles a halibut with a gigantic eye at the top of its head. In another holds in the palm of his hand a spindly "offshore spider," which he says is "hopefully not poisonous." It can be seen that some of these fishes are a deep, inky black, while others are translucent, and several have eyes that appear to glow. Although they might appear nightmarish and grotesque to surface-dwellers, their peculiar features are adaptations by nature that allow them to thrive in the cold and dark ocean depths, according to Live Science.

Most undiscovered species of marine animals reside in the deep-ocean region called the mesopelagic zone, which ranges from depths of about 650 to 3,300 feet (200 to 1,000 meters) and may swim closer to the surface to feed. But when going way down deep, these fish navigate waters that are much colder and darker than those in shallower marine environments, said John Sparks, a curator in the ichthyology department at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

"The thinking used to be that because the deep sea is a very homogeneous environment in terms of temperature and salinity, that there were just a few species but that they were very widespread," Sparks explained.

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