A Graphical Breakthrough Will Permit Lifelike Skin Texture In Future Games

By R. Siva Kumar - 15 Aug '15 03:14AM
  • Chris Milk's 'The Treachery of Sanctuary' seen on display at the Barbican's Digital Revolution exhibition on July 2, 2014 in London, England.
  • (Photo : Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images for Barbican Art Gallery) The exhibition brings together artists, designers, film makers, musicians and architects who push the boundaries of creativity that digitial technology can offer, and runs from July 3 until September 14, 2014.

A new breakthrough with computer graphics convention Siggraph in LA will totally transform how characters appear in games, according to unilad.

The USC Institute for Creative Technologies and the Imperial College London is expected to expose a novel world of realistic computer graphics. Both the companies have struck upon a new and brilliant technique to capture "the subtle deformations of human skin as it changes organically".

Right now, motion capture can create faces in video games, even as it picks up nuances missed by an animator.

This new method is able to capture an actor's face "at a resolution of 10 microns in a specially designed rig", allowing for pin point accuracy down to the pores in the skin.

First the custom software is used, and then the captured image is transferred on the artificial skin of a CG character.

To simulate human skin on its own without the need for actors, it will create totally lifelike, yet "fictitious" characters. Even though this technology is amazing, its usage has not been made totally clear.

Those who want to understand more can check out the USC Institute for Creative Technologies website for more information, and updates on their progress with the project.

YouTube/ICT Graphics Lab

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